Volunteering

From its inception in 2003, the Forum has been built on the volunteer efforts of HR professionals around the region.  They have worked to produce podcasts, pull together job ads, engaged in regional research, hosted radio programs, designed logos, worked with students, written blog posts and much more.

Our volunteers come with a serious commitment, and actually work under what we call “honor contracts” – signed documents that are not legally binding, but represent professional agreements built on a foundation of mutual integrity. Our volunteers agree to get more out of the experience than they put in, thereby increasing their visibility in the community and also getting a chance to practice and demonstrate new skills in a non-threatening environment.

As a result, we are always on the lookout for volunteer talent, and today we are recruiting for the following unpaid, volunteer positions:

  • CaribHRForum.com blogger / writer / content developers
  • CaribHRForum news producer
  • CaribHR.Radio show host
  • CaribHRForum Linkedin group moderator

As you may imagine, many of these posts give others in our community the opportunity to get toCaribHRForum Volunteers know you and see what you can do in a professional capacity.  All of the above roles are pivotal, and will greatly enhance your professional brand across the region.

If you are interested in applying, let us know by sending email to francis@caribhrforum.com, or by using the Contact Us link in the menu up top.

Also, if you’d like to craft your own position based on your skills and interests here let us know – we are open to new ideas!

One thought on “Volunteering

  1. Suzette Henry-Campbell

    I am interested in adding my voice to the list of current contributors. I am currently a Doctoral Student (Conflict Analysis and Resolution) looking to share the incredible academic experience with others. The aim is to inspire critical thinking on the opportunities to improve our interaction with others and how to manage the complex range of emotions that exist in stressful encounters.

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